Masked Depression

Masked depression was a term largely used during the 70s and 80s to refer to atypical or hidden depression which is often characterized by somatic symptoms such as migraines, stomach ache, fatigue, sexual dysfunction, and sleep disturbances without specific organic cause.

For instance, a professor is often experiencing headaches and gastrointestinal disturbances. He usually reasons out that he has too much work for social activities but he actually has lost interest in mingling with others. When asked about his condition, he explains that he is just a bit stressed. Also, when his friend told him to “get help," he got angry and told him to just leave him alone. Currently, masked depression as a diagnosis is no longer used.

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History of Psychology
History of Psychology